Major Objective
Actors breathe life into the characters written by the playwright. Using voice, body and movement, they creatively turn a written character into a real-life person for the entertainment of our paying audiences.

Qualifications

Experience is not necessary. Some actors appear on stage for the first time ever at OLT. Vision, creativity, commitment, strong communication skills, maturity (not related to age), reliability, ability to use the body and voice as a means of expression, and (most important) the ability to take direction are the qualities needed.

Responsibilities
• The actors are cast by the Director at auditions (the audition date and details are posted on the OLT website several weeks prior to each audition.) At the audition actors do cold readings from the script to allow the Director to hear them, and get a sense of their ability to move and interact with others. Auditions usually take place on the theatre stage with everyone in attendance. It helps to buy or borrow (the Library is a good resource) a copy of the script in advance, or see what you can find online, to become familiar with the material.
• Actors must work with the Director and fellow cast members to implement the Director’s vision of the play. The Director is in charge of the production and has final say on characterization and look and feel of the play.
• Research the role where appropriate, and explore various options for characterization.
• Learn accents if required; and memorize lines.
• Follow the Director’s instructions.
• Attend all scheduled rehearsals and be committed for the full length of the production process, including matinee performances and, if applicable, Festival dates.
• It is expected that actors contribute some of the refreshments during the weeks of rehearsal. During the run there are potluck parties after performances on Fridays and Saturdays, and actors and crew are expected to contribute.Orientation/Training

Productions at OLT use a full range of actors – some with many years of experience and some with no experience at all. The Director will cast from a general sense of your experience and abilities; his/her vision of the play, and some physical criteria (age, size, appearance). Ultimately, the Director is responsible to the Board of Directors and the Season Planning Committee for putting the best possible product on stage, and therefore will cast with care. If an inexperienced actor is cast, the Director will work with them to develop their character and understanding of stage craft.The OLT holds various workshops throughout the season for the benefit of actors and others, such as voice and movement training and the Actor’s Gym. Stay tuned to the website and OLT Facebook group for notification of classes. In some instances, a play will have particular requirements, such as stage fighting or sword fighting. In that case, the theatre will arrange to have training provided, either formal or informal, to equip you with the skills needed to perform.

Time Commitment

The time period from audition to closing night is approximately three months – the final five weeks requiring six days a week. This is a major time commitment but the benefits are enormous. The OLT is a community theatre – therefore the rehearsal schedule assumes that actors and crew have jobs that occupy them during the day. Rehearsals are in the evenings (and sometimes Sunday afternoons). There is one Sunday matinee. Most rehearsals will be scheduled from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m.The actors are expected to do whatever is required to support the Director in realizing the vision of the play. Therefore ad hoc rehearsals may be added and, for technically complicated shows, extended technical rehearsals may occur. One production per season may be entered into the Eastern Ontario Drama League Festival requiring the cast to be available for the Festival dates and refresher rehearsals (note: the OLT run of the play could be a few months before the Festival.)

On-the-job supervision

The Director is the “Supreme Being”/ “Commander in Chief” during rehearsals. The Stage Manager is the “Supreme Being” / “Commander in Chief” once the show opens. The actors follow their directions!

Benefits
The payback to performing is enormous. Not only are you given the opportunity to entertain over 5,000 people who come to see our shows, you also are part of something greater: a team of artistic and creative individuals who at the OLT because they love it. You interact with people from all walks of life in all age groups. The beauty of community theatre is that by day you can be a lawyer, a student, a civil servant, and by night, you become Romeo or Hedda Gabler! Countless friendships have been formed at the OLT, and sometimes people who meet on stage maintain that bond for a lifetime.

The theatre gives people many opportunities to celebrate…. and OLT casts and crews really know how to party!

Major Objective
The Director brings the playwright’s text off the page and transforms it into a fully realized stage production that will be seen by thousands of OLT patrons. To succeed in this the Director must assemble a creative team of designers and choose a cast who can fulfill his or her vision of the play. The Director oversees and has final say on all aspects of the production.

Qualifications
Vision, commitment, very strong communication skills, maturity, reliability, good people skills and problem-solving skills are all requirements of a Director. Directors on the OLT Directors List (see Orientation below) who are interested in participating in a given season must submit an Expression-of-Interest to the Season Planning Committee which then proposes a Director for each play. The SPC’s proposed slate of directors is submitted to the Board of Directors for approval. This takes place more than a year in advance of each season.

Responsibilities
• Develop an overall vision of the play;
• Select a team of designers and who can fulfill this vision in collaboration;
• Approve final designs for set, costumes, lighting, sound, props, etc.;
• Schedule and manage production meetings, auditions and casting;
• Lead rehearsals. Direct and inspire actors;
• Advise cast and crew of protocols, security, emergency procedures, etc.;
• Secure the theatre each night after rehearsal or performance (responsibility shared with the Assistant to the Director).Orientation/Training

Because familiarity with the OLT is essential, Directors are chosen from an existing OLT Directors List. There is an Associate Director Program in place at OLT to mentor potential new Directors (either new to directing, or new to the OLT). All Directors must first have been an Associate Director (see the volunteer description of Associate Director for details). A production manual and “kit” are provided to the Director by the OLT for guidance and support.

Time Commitment
The Director leads production meetings, auditions and rehearsals, and remains present or available throughout the three weeks of performances. (Attendance at performances may be split between the Director and an Assistant to the Director). Production meetings are held months in advance of the play. Rehearsals begin approximately ten weeks in advance of the play, starting with 3 per week, then 4 per week, then (in the two weeks before opening night) 6 per week. The 3-week play run is Tuesday to Saturday plus one Sunday matinee.Preparation for a production begins as soon as the season is announced and the Director is assigned. Throughout the production process, the Director (along with the AD) is the first to arrive and the last to leave. It is a key position to the theatre requiring a major commitment of time and energy.

On-the-job supervision
OLT Directors are given a high degree of autonomy once they have been offered a production. Directors are accountable to the Season Planning Committee, the Board of Directors, and the audiences who purchase tickets to see the production. Directors become members of the Artistic Quality Committee which evaluates all productions, and offers input and feedback throughout the production period.

Benefits
The Director is the artistic leader of his/her production. It is an incredibly challenging yet rewarding experience to take a script from page to stage, and OLT’s Directors are entrusted with the task. The process of forming a team and bringing it together to tell a story for the audience is enormously satisfying.

Major Objective
The Assistant to the Director (AD) is chosen by the Director to provide support throughout the production. The AD is the liaison between your show’s entire production team, the theatre staff, the Volunteer Committee and the Directors and Assistants of the plays both preceding and following your production. All productions must have at least one Assistant to the Director. A Director may have as many ADs as he or she chooses. The shared responsibilities are determined jointly by the Director and ADs.

Qualifications
Commitment, maturity (not related to age), reliability, good people skills and problem-solving skills.

Responsibilities
Administrative:
• Use the production manual and “kit” as requested by OLT;
• Assist the Director in the audition process;
• Provide a list of cast and production heads to the box office, general manager, and technical coordinator as soon as casting is complete;
• Conduct an orientation and tour of the theatre for all newcomers;
• Ensure that cast and crew follow protocols, security procedures, etc. as prescribed by technical director and stage manager;
• Prepare and submit house programme information to the box office. Verify and proofread versions as they are returned before finalization;
• Provide and then collect volunteer registration forms and submit all to the business office before the end of the production;
• Arrange with the photographer for “head shots” and production photos;
• Coordinate Invited Dress Rehearsal and liaise with office on requirements for Preview, Talkbacks and/or Socials.
• Secure the theatre each night after rehearsal or performance (responsibility shared with the Director)

Artistic:
If and as requested by the Director, duties may include such activities as taking blocking notes, verifying sound levels and sight lines and providing an accurate copy of the script with sound and light cues to the Stage Manager.

Social:

• Coordinate food and refreshments for each night of the run;
• Determine if and when the cast and crew wish to have ‘party nights’ and coordinate (usually Fridays during rehearsal; Fridays and Saturdays during run);
• Liaise with the General Manager to determine the current guidelines for closing night.

Orientation/Training
Knowledge of the OLT and its ways is essential. The best way to familiarize yourself is to first be part of a crew and “shadow” an AD on a production.

Time
An AD is required to be at the auditions, at all rehearsals and all performances. If a production has more than one AD, this can be divided between or among them. Rehearsals begin approximately ten weeks before each play starting with 3 per week, then 4 per week, then (in the two weeks before opening night) 6 per week. The 3-week play run is Tuesday to Saturday plus one Sunday matinee. The AD is also required at all production meetings.

Commitment
An AD is usually the first to arrive and the last to leave. Rehearsals and performances cannot run smoothly without an AD present. It is a VERY important position that requires a major commitment of time and energy.

On-the-job supervision
Assistants to the Director are chosen by, and report to, the Director.

Benefits
The AD is the major point of contact for everyone involved in the production – cast, crew and theatre staff. You will become friends with all involved and you will have the undying gratitude of EVERYONE.

Major Objective
The purpose of the Associate Director position is to provide an interested candidate with the necessary background in OLT procedures to be considered for inclusion on the OLT’s list of play directors. The Associate Director position is not a training vehicle for would-be directors, nor a mentorship program.

Qualifications
There are two ways to be considered for the Associate Director program:
• You must be a director with a proven body of work elsewhere who would now like to be considered for directing at the Ottawa Little Theatre.
• You must be an OLT volunteer with enough varied experience on a number of productions to feel that you now have the qualifications to be considered for directing at the OLT.
It would be useful to have first fulfilled the responsibilities of Assistant to the Director on at least one show beforehand.

Play Directors are appointed to direct specific plays by the OLT Board of Directors on the advice of the Season Planning Committee. To join the Associate Director program, a candidate must be paired with a Play Director willing to take on an Associate. The Associate should make their interest known to the Artistic Quality Committee. The candidate will be asked to provide a resume of experience, and to go through an interview process. There is limit to the number of Associates allowed to participate in a given season.

A person who eventually wants to direct should gain experience and make their interest known through networking. Opportunities specific to directing include attending workshops in directing, directing scene studies at the Actors Gym, or directing Play Readings or EODL One-Act Festival entries.

Responsibilities
The Associate Director audits the OLT production process, observing rehearsals from the Director’s point of view “behind the table” and learning how a specific Director works. If an Associate Director wants the role to be more than that, they are advised to sit down beforehand with the Director and discuss expectations on both sides. An Associate Director sometimes takes on some of the responsibilities of Assistant to the Director.

Time commitment
Once an Associate Director has been accepted by a Director, they should be involved in the production process from the very beginning – including auditions, production meetings, rehearsals and post-production meeting – a time commitment of at least three months.

On-the-job supervision
Supervision will be provided by the Director.

Becoming a director

All OLT Directors started as Associate Directors, or the equivalent at the time. Although an Associate Director may hope eventually to direct at the OLT, even making it to the Directors List brings no guarantees. There are currently more than twice as many names on the Directors List as there are plays in a season. In choosing a Director to recommend to the Board of Directors, the Season Planning Committee’s goal is artistic quality and to attract and please an audience, and ultimately to ensure the financial stability of the OLT – not to give as many people as possible a chance at directing. The Committee tries to entrust each play to an experienced Director who has demonstrated previous success. There needs to be a full roster of strong, active Directors to ensure that there will always be enough available.

Major Objective
To help with fast costume changes and costume emergencies during the run of the play. To help construct and/or alter costumes if skilled.

Qualifications

• Dexterity to do up buttons fast, buckle on shoes, etc.
• Ability to move quickly.
• Ability to maintain composure under stress
• Willingness to learn and ability to follow instruction and take direction, and to be on time.

Responsibilities
• Check that all costumes are in correct place (backstage left or right or in dressing room as per show instructions).
• Support actors with fast costume changes. This varies with each production depending on number of actors and complexity of costume changes.
• Do any minor repairs (sew on buttons, fix hems, etc.) or alert Costume Designer or Wardrobe Mistress if repairs are required.
• Sometimes iron clothing. Sometimes start a load of laundry.
• Even if there are no costume changes that need support, an assistant is sometimes required in case there is a malfunction during a performance.

Orientation/Training
• It is helpful to see a run-through of the play, then to assist with costume changes during the rehearsals. Depending on the complexity of the changes it may take a number of rehearsals to get the timing right and to learn the best way to support the actor who requires the fast change.
• If shirts, etc. need ironing, training is necessary for inexperienced volunteers.
• A tour of the sewing room and wardrobe storage is helpful in case repairs or replacement of items is needed during the show.

Time
Training per show requires approximately 2 to 4 rehearsals.
If helping with sewing or putting together costumes, a number of evenings in the weeks prior to the beginning of the run might be required.
Arrive approximately one hour before show time to assist with costume changes.
Stay until end of play.

Commitment
An assistant should volunteer for 6 performances during the run of the show for the benefit of the actors and the production. (The more personnel changes there are, the more chances of mistakes and of slowing down fast changes.) Depending on the complexity of the changes, Costume Assistants should attend at least 3 rehearsals.
Be on time. If you cannot do a show that you have signed up for, find a replacement and /or inform the Designer. Inform the Costume Designer or the Stage Manager if you are not available at the last minute.

On-the-job supervision
Costume Assistants report to the Costume Designer and the Stage Manager.

Benefits

You will play an integral role in the success of the production, and you will meet and become friends with an eclectic mix of individuals from all walks of life.

Main Objective
To design and either create or provide appropriate costumes for all the characters in the play. Supervise a team for placing costumes correctly, for fast costume changes and costume emergencies, and for the care and cleaning of costumes during the run of the play.

Qualifications

• Design skills and understanding of colours and fabrics, and of fashion styles of the period in which the play takes place;
• Familiarity with the OLT wardrobe storage system, and of other Ottawa resources such as second-hand and consignment shops, fabric outlets, other theatre groups’ wardrobes;
• Willingness to spend time researching and tracking down appropriate costumes;
• Initiative and the ability to bargain and think creatively;
• Seamstress and alteration skills are a definite asset;
• Good people skills.

Responsibilities

Before Rehearsals Begin:
• Attend Production Meeting to collaborate on establishing a costume design;
• Consult Technical Director regarding budget;
• Research the time period of the play in which the costume designs will be used;
• Collaborate with Director, Set and Lighting Designers on a colour palette;

After Rehearsals Begin:
• Attend first rehearsal and present design concept;
• Attend other rehearsals as required;
• Provide rehearsal costumes if necessary (eg. long skirts for a period piece);
• Take measurements of all cast members and record these measurements on individual charts for each actor;
• Do preliminary fittings and keep a record on individual charts of progress; which costume pieces are finished; what is lacking and what needs to be changed;
• Locate in OLT wardrobe, or buy, rent, borrow or create costumes and accessories (shoes, hats, gloves, jewellery, purses, etc.);
• Adapt clothing to suit a character and the actor’s activities (safety, comfort and moveability);
• Sew or adjust costumes if necessary;
• Attend production meetings;
• Provide thank-yous for house program;

Once Show is on Stage:
• Arrange costume parade on stage to view the costumes as a whole before play opens;
• Attend first run-through;
• Label costumes for each character if necessary;
• Lay out costume policies and rules to actors regarding activities while in costume, such as smoking, eating, etc. and the wearing of costume covers;
• Provide ditty bags or trays for each actor to hold jewellery, etc.;
• Arrange for backstage quick-change areas if necessary;
• Coordinate having costumes in correct location (dressing room, stage right, stage left) and schedule dressers for costume changes.

Once Show Opens:
• Arrange to repair, clean and iron costumes during the run;
• Train actors to hang up their costumes and take proper care of them, and to immediately report any problems requiring care or repair;
• Check costumes daily for damage;
• Take photos for portfolio if desired;

After the Run:
• Launder or dry-clean any clothing article that has been used and return to appropriate location. Spray disinfectant in shoes used;
• Ensure dressing rooms are cleaned;
• Attend post-production meeting.

Orientation/Training
• A novice should work alongside an experienced OLT Costume Designer through all stages of the production from script reading to helping backstage during the run for at least one production to provide a solid grounding for proceeding with an independent design or a co-design.
• Costume design courses are available and can be extremely useful. Training in fashion design and alteration is an asset.
• If someone has designed costumes elsewhere, mentoring by an experienced OLT Costume Designer through an OLT production should be sufficient. This might not be necessary if previous proven experience is considerable.

Time commitment
• Work needs to begin 3 months before the play opens. Meetings with the Director will require 3 to 6 hours at this stage.
• Locating and creating costumes will vary widely depending on how many actors there are in a play, how many costume changes each requires, and the era in which the play is set.
• All production meetings (usually evenings) should be attended, as well as the first read-through and a number of evening rehearsals to meet with the actors and have them try on costumes.
• The Costume Designer should attend the post-production meeting.

On-the-job supervision
Supervision will be provided by the OLT Technical Director, Play Director and, in the case of a mentoring situation, another OLT Costume Designer.

Benefits
• Costume design is a specialized creative artistic endeavour with many rewards. The result is an artistic product that is on view on stage for a period of three weeks. At the OLT, your costumes will be seen by over 5,500 people for over 2 hours per performance. Costumes are critical to the success of a production and are recognized as such.
• The Costume Designer becomes involved in almost all facets of a production.
• The Costume Designer is named prominently in the show’s house program. (No honorarium is given for costume design at the OLT.)
• The Costume Designer participates in all the social aspects of a production (weekend parties) and will earn enormous gratitude from the cast for helping to make them look and feel wonderful.

Major Objective
YOU are the main point of contact between the theatre and the audience. YOU cordially receive patrons and direct them within the theatre, answering all questions with courtesy.

Qualifications
• You must speak English well.
• You must be well groomed and dressed in black to meet dress code requirements.
• Congeniality and good manners are a must!
• Your fitness level must be adequate for you to stand for more than one hour and to walk up the staircase repeatedly while assisting patrons.
• CPR, AED and First Aid training are definite assets.

Responsibilities
• Advise the House Manager that you have arrived. He/She is your direct supervisor.
• Know your way around the Foyer and familiarize yourself with the basics of each production (running time, number of intermissions, comedy/drama) so that you can answer patron inquiries.
• Welcome each patron with a smile while taking tickets and/or handing out house programs.
• Open the Besserer Street entrance door when the bell is rung and assist patrons using that entrance.
• Assist patrons with walkers and/or wheelchairs and inform them where to store their walking aids during the show. Wheelchair patrons are usually seated in the left hand aisle.
• If you are watching the show, sit in the last two rows of the left side of the theatre and remain aware of the audience. If someone is in need of assistance, such as exiting during the show, lead them out by a side door to minimize light spill and noise distraction. Wait for them to return before you sit down again.
• Assist the House Manager in the event of an incident and/or emergency.
• Assist in opening and closing all doors to the theatre while patrons are leaving the theatre.
• You may leave the theatre once the House Manager has confirmed that all is done.

Orientation
The House Manager will provide you with the basic details you need to know. Volunteer orientation sessions will provide you with a broader overview of the OLT.

Time Commitment
• We ask that you commit to one shift per production and that you are able to work at most of the shows produced and hosted at the OLT. On average this will involve approximately 4 hours per month.
• You are required to arrive 1 hour and 15 minutes PRIOR to show time. Most shows start at 7:30 p.m., therefore you must arrive at 6:15 p.m. Matinees start at 2 p.m. so you are required at the OLT by 12:45 p.m. You should stay for the duration of the show unless you have made prior arrangements with the coordinator.

Benefits

• Be part of a great community of patrons and volunteers who are there specifically for an entertaining time.
• Connect with artistic training opportunities within the Ottawa theatre community.
• Gain experience in hospitality.
• Opportunity to see free theatre!

Main Objective
To aid the OLT in raising funds for its productions and operations.

Qualifications

 

A willingness to approach personal contacts to ask for their support, and a willingness to cultivate new contacts and then encourage them to become supporters. Experience organizing special events or experience in fundraising would be assets, but are not required.

Responsibilities

• Participate in one or more of the following activities:
– organizing special fundraising events and selling tickets to them;
– asking individuals to make a donation;
– asking businesses to become a sponsor, purchase an ad, or purchase a preview night;
– approaching your own contacts on behalf of the theatre to ask for their support.
• Attend monthly committee meetings to coordinate activities.
• Purchase tickets to and attend fundraising events.
• Make a donation of your own at the level that is comfortable for you so that you can honestly say you personally believe the OLT is deserving of support.

Orientation/Training:

One two-hour meeting to discuss and practice how to “make an ask.”

Time Commitment
Members should commit to a one-year term when joining a committee.
Total time commitment ranges from 80-92 hours per year broken down as follows:
• 2- to 3-hour meeting each month;
• 20-30 hours per year approaching people/businesses to ask for their support and to follow up on your initial ask until you receive an answer (each committee member will have 5-10 contacts to approach);
• 8-12 hours per year attending fundraising events;
• Optional 20 hours per year for sub-committee meetings to plan fundraising events.

On-the-job supervision
Chair of the Committee and/or Director of Fundraising or Marketing.

Benefits
An opportunity to expand your individual/business network, to help shape entertaining and effective fundraising events and to meet others who believe in and support the OLT.

Major Objective
Working with the Assistant to the Director, you will ensure that cast and crew are fed and have fun during the run of the play.

Qualifications
• Good organizational skills;
• Ability to move quickly and efficiently;
• Reliability (must show up when scheduled);
• Ability to plan and organize menus and create fun theme nights.

Responsibilities

Opening Night:
• Decide on a menu for the evening;
• Pick up groceries where needed;
• Organize and prepare food prior to final curtain;
• Ensure that the Green Room is properly set up;
• Put out dishes, cutlery, napkins and glasses;
• Ensure that cast and crew get priority followed by guests;
• Remain to assist with clean up.

Friday and Saturday nights:
• Decide on theme and menu for the evening;
• Coordinate potluck contributions from cast and crew and pick up groceries where needed;
• Organize and prepare food prior to the end of the play;
• Ensure that the Green Room is properly set up;
• Put out dishes, cutlery, napkins and glasses;
• Ensure that cast and crew get priority followed by guests;
• Remain to assist with clean up.

Closing night:
• Decide on a menu for the evening;
• Pick up groceries;
• Organize and prepare food prior to the end of the play;
• Ensure that the Green Room is properly set up;
• Put out dishes, cutlery, napkins and glasses;
• Ensure that cast and crew get priority followed by guests;
• Ensure that kitchen and refrigerator are clean and tidy for the following cast.

Orientation/Training

Introduction to the OLT: policies, expectations, etiquette, environment, etc. will be explained. You will be given a complete briefing of required duties before, during and after the production.

Time Commitment
A minimum of two shows per week for the 3-week run of the production (6 hours per night – 36 hours total).

On-the-job supervision

Assistant to the Director

Benefits
• Great way to meet fun and dedicated people;
• Enjoy refreshments, collegial atmosphere;
• Chance to gain experience which might lead to more challenging positions.

Major Objective
To help build a solid and supportive artistic component of the theatre, that contributes to the theatre’s sustainability by ensuring the highest quality product, and by doing everything feasible to optimize box office revenue and enhance staff and volunteer capacity and experience.

Qualifications
A love of event planning, education planning, and / or organizing.

Responsibilities

• Attend meetings set by the Chair and vote on all deliberations and decisions.
• Assist in the development, amendment and maintenance of policies of the committee
• Aid in development and integration of a full program of training and development opportunities – working with the Volunteer Committee, Technical Director/Stage Manager, and Director of Education
• Help administer professional development programs/opportunities: directors, acting company, technical
• Help to identify opportunities and administer such activities as:
Eastern Ontario One Act Festival
Janigan Studio
One-Act Playwriting Competition
• Liaise with Volunteer Committee and other special project committees
• Ensure optimal opportunity for success through interaction and involvement with the “creative” process as necessary
• Help implement changes as required to ensure highest quality performance and audience experience

Orientation/Training

No training required. Some experience in event planning or theatre production is desirable. Connections and/or research know-how is an asset. Have you ever planned a party or an event at work? – that counts!

Time Commitment

• Evening meetings once a month
• Evenings and weekends if helping plan a Festival event in collaboration with a sub-committee.

On-the-job supervision
Co-Chairs of the Learning and Special Programming Sub-Committee

Benefits

• Be part of the changing face of the Ottawa little Theatre and the quality of its product.
• Connect with artistic training opportunities within the Ottawa theatre community.
• Gain experience in event planning.

Major Objective
The Lighting Designer designs and implements a lighting plan which will work with the Set Designer’s stage plan to achieve the Director’s vision of the show. The Designer also schedules and trains a crew to operate the lights during the run of the show.

 

Qualifications
The Lighting Designer needs an extensive knowledge of the equipment available and be knowledgeable in the theories of lighting design.

Responsibilities

• The Lighting Designer is part of the production team. The Designer’s involvement begins approximately 3 months before the play opens, even before the auditions.
• The Lighting Designer reads the script and then attends a production meeting where the Director will discuss his/her vision and concepts for the show.
• After the rehearsal process begins, the Lighting Designer will attend some rehearsals. Then, using the Set Designer’s plan, he/she will create the lighting design.
• When the cast moves from the rehearsal hall to the stage two weeks before the show opens, the Lighting Designer and assistants take several hours to hang, gel, and focus lights according to the plan.
• They then program the lighting board with the cues required for the show.
• At this point the Lighting Designer calls in the team of operators (crew) to rehearse operating the cues during the final rehearsals. The Lighting Designer should be prepared to attend rehearsals and performances until the operators feel confident in operating by themselves.

Orientation/Training
Training is usually accomplished by working as an assistant to an experienced Lighting Designer. The OLT sometimes offers courses in design. (Regularly check Adult Workshops under LEARNING on the website.)

Time Commitment
Conceiving the lighting design can take place during the two months when the show rehearses. Implementing the lighting design requires considerable time in the 2 weeks before the show opens. The Lighting Designer and the assistants often have to come in at times when the cast is not present, so they make be working from 5 to 7 PM a few days, as well as on weekends. Once the show opens, the Lighting Designer’s job is mostly done but he/she should monitor the production, ensure crew coverage and be available to address issues and problems.

On-the-job supervision
The Lighting Designer and his/her crew will work with the OLT Technical Director for the set up of the plan. The operation of the show will be done by the lighting crew supervised by the Stage Manager.

Benefits
Lighting design is a fulfilling technical and creative activity with many visible and hidden rewards. Helping to create a visual atmosphere that brings a production to life for thousands of paying patrons is a major and satisfying accomplishment. At the OLT, your design will be seen by over 5,500 people.
While the Lighting Designer must complete significant work before the show opens, there is significant opportunity to interact with the show actors and crew for social events. Regular parties build team and community spirit and all designers and crew are invited to attend.

Major Objective
the lighting crew member operates the lighting board during the final onstage rehearsals and the run of the production as designated by the Lighting Designer who will train you in advance.

Qualifications
Being “tech savvy” is a bonus to the OLT, however no formal qualifications are required. A willingness to learn and the ability to accept responsibility are essential, and you must be able to commit the required time to the production.

Responsibilities
Arrive one hour before show time and report to the Stage Manager. Head to the lighting booth to do the lighting check and go into the first cue (pre-show). At 7:55 PM the Stage Manager will call up to the booth to start the show and from this point the Stage Manager will call all the cues. At the conclusion of the show, the Stage Manager will “take control” of the lights and you will shut down the system.

Orientation/Training
Be available to the Lighting Designer before the play opens to become familiar with the script and the production, the lighting board, and all lighting cues for that show.

Time Commitment
Be prepared to do at least two shifts a week during the standard three-week run in addition to 2 or 3 evenings during the two final weeks of rehearsal on stage. You must arrive one hour before curtain up, and plays are normally 2 to 2.5 hours in duration.

Commitment is what we are looking for from all volunteers. If you sign up to run lights for a performance, you MUST be prepared to fill that obligation or arrange for a fellow crew member to cover your shift. The show cannot go on without lights!

On-the-job supervision
After training and orientation with the Lighting Designer, you will be shadowed by an experienced operator until you are confident and comfortable enough to do it on your own. There will always be someone available to answer any questions you may have.

Benefits
A feeling of achievement and the satisfaction of being an essential part of an artistic team are the primary benefits. You will also be learning an important theatre skill. Eventually you may be interested in assisting the Lighting Designer as he/she creates the design, hangs and focuses the fixtures and programs the lighting board. The final step could be to become a Lighting Designer yourself. Socializing, parties and developing friendships are also a significant benefit.

Major Objective
To provide makeup and/or hair services, instruction and design for a stage production which could be set in modern day or any pieces.

Qualifications

• An interest in theatrical makeup and hair design;
• Good visual colour perception and discrimination of colours including shades and brightness under stage lighting;
• Deductive reasoning and visualization skills to deal with various methods of creatively solving problems;
• Good communications and research skills;
• Patience and tact;
• Ability to work under pressure;
• Attention to detail;
• Flexibility

Responsibilities

• To discuss the Director’s vision for the play and, if necessary, research period makeup and hair styles, the latter sometimes involving wigs;
• To know the makeup and/or requirements for a show and to ensure that appropriate products are available well in advance of the production;
• To meet and discuss with each cast member their makeup requirements, allergies and your ideas for their makeup and/or hair;
• To set up the dressing room with a designated place for each cast member;
• To ensure that each designated actor’s place has hygienic makeup, sponge applicators, tissues, Q-tips and other necessary supplies;
• To instruct and explain, when necessary, application of products and/or detail of characterization methods;
• To be available for help and problem solving until the cast member feels confident in their own application abilities;
• To ensure that all products used by the actors are clean, in good repair and maintained;
• To clean dressing room after a production and to sanitize all products which are the property of the theatre.

Orientation/Training
Orientation/training involves being an assistant to an experienced makeup/hair designer for a show before working on one of your own.

Time Commitment
This varies per show. Some plays require a makeup and/or hair supervisor for every performance of a three-week run, but for many productions, the actors can manage on their own once they have been shown what to do. Makeup and hair training usually takes place for two or three nights and one Sunday afternoon during the final week before opening night. Supplies should be checked once or twice a week during the run. Cleanup takes place after the production closes.

On-the-job supervision
The Director or Assistant to the Director of the production. Interested designers should work on at least one production as an assistant to the designer.

Benefits
The satisfaction of being involved in the “look” of a production that is on stage for three weeks in front of over 5,500 audience members. Camaraderie, backstage theatre training and experience, and social events.

Major Objective
To support the actors during rehearsals when they are trying to move from using their script, to being “off-book” and reciting their lines from memory.

Qualifications

Ability to follow along with a script, and quickly “prompt” the actor with the correct line should the actor ask for it. Strong reading skills are a requirement.

Responsibilities

• Attends all rehearsals and follows the rehearsals with the script.
• Once the actors are “off book” and are trying to recite their lines from memory, the Promptor is the life-line who feeds the actor the lines if they forget them.
• Makes pencil notes in the script of the lines that the actors have trouble with, and helps identify problem areas for the actor to work on.
• Supports actors by running “Italian line runs” as additional practice for learning the script.
• Some theatres have a Promptor present in the wings during the full run of the show in case an actor “dries” during a performance, however, except for exceptional circumstances, the OLT does not have a Promptor present once the show has opened. The expectation is that the actors will know their lines perfectly and, if they don’t, they’ll cleverly be able to get out of trouble or “save” each other on stage. Therefore the Promptor, though always welcome, is not typically required once the show opens. (Prompters sometimes help with something else backstage to remain involved with the production).

Orientation/Training

You will receive prompting instructions from the Director and/or Assistant to the Director, and you will chat with the actors to find out their needs. All actors and crew members receive an orientation to the theatre and its policies.Time Commitment
You are required for all rehearsals starting the week prior to the scheduled “off-book” rehearsal through to opening night, including possible ad hoc rehearsals if required to do additional line runs with the cast. (On very rare occasions, a Prompter is required during the run of the show).

On-the-job supervision

Assistant to the Director.

Benefits
The Promptor is involved in the development process of the production and is there for rehearsals where a lot of the fun and relationship building takes place. There are parties on Fridays and Saturdays, and friendships, etc. throughout. The Prompter is the “Keeper of the Lines” – and any actor who has tried to memorize a role knows how powerful this position truly is!

Major Objective
Properties are the movable items used by the actors during a play. The Props Designer must find and/or create all props required, and ensure (with props crew) that they are where they need to be for the actors’ use for every rehearsal and performance throughout the run.

Qualifications

• Creativity to find and/or make props.
• Knowledge of design trends in furniture, kitchenware, accessories and other props.
• Organizational and communications skills to recruit, train and manage props crew to guarantee proper placement of props throughout set changes.
• Ability to collaborate with director, actors and production crew.

Responsibilities

Before rehearsals start (ie. three months before the production):
• Read the play and create a preliminary prop list;
• Attend a pre-show production meeting;

During rehearsals:
• Attend the first read-through to get a sense of the play;
• Obtain a set of working props at the start and during the first few rehearsals. Be available to add new working props as required by the Director;
• Create or obtain final props;

Once actors are off book and blocking is completed:
• Attend rehearsals to determine what else is needed and where props should be placed – whether preset or on a props table;
• Determine how many running crew will be needed for each night of the production;
• Put together a crew and schedule;
• Create a finalized props list and instructions for any pre-show work such as food preparation and instructions for props placement during scene changes;

Once the show is onstage for rehearsals (2 weeks before opening):
• Make sure all required props are available;
• Tape props tables showing positions of all carry-on props;
• Invite props crew to attend rehearsals – first to watch from the front, then to observe backstage, then to work the rehearsal;
• Set up a crew schedule;

Once show opens:
• Monitor use of consumables and buy more if necessary;
• Fix any broken props;
• Ensure that crew members show up when required or be ready to jump in at the last moment to cover for them;
• Act as a crew member;

Closing night:
• Help with set strike;
• Remove all props. Return borrowed ones to owners and send thank-yous, return others to the right place in the props cupboard or the drapes cupboards;
• Create thank-you cards for crew;

After Closing:
• Attend post-production meeting.

Orientation/Training

In order to be a Props Designer, a person should have worked as a member of several props crews, then they should be given a show with an experienced Props Designer as a mentor.

Time Commitment
This is really dependent on the show but normally includes the full 15 weeks of production plus a couple of meetings before and the post-production meeting after:
• All shows require 3 hours to read the play; 1- 3 hours to prepare a props list; 3 hours for the initial read-through; 3 hours to gather working props.
• The time required to create or find props could be as little as 10 hours for a play like Drinking Alone (contemporary, simple single set) to countless hours for a play like And Then There Were None (retractable knives, sailor figures, syringes….period piece with a complex plot). Farces and mysteries tend to be the toughest.
• Time required for rehearsal and choreographing set changes is also play-dependent. A complicated play like Woman in Black(period piece – multiple sets), or I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change (musical, multiple scene and costume changes) require a lot of time to understand exactly what is needed to make things run smoothly.
• Most production hours are in the evening, but if searching for props is required, you may need to work during the day when stores or agencies are open.

On-the-job supervision
Director, Stage Manager and Technical Director

Benefits
Outlet for creative energy, collegial atmosphere, parties.
Chance to gain experience which might lead to paid positions elsewhere.

Major Objective
Properties are the movable items used by the actors during a play. The Props Crew member ensures that props are where they need to be for the actors’ use for every performance throughout the run. The Props Crew might assist the Designer in finding and/or creating props, and might be required to assist at some rehearsals.

Qualifications

• Reliability and focus to ensure proper placement of props before, during and after the show.
• Creativity to find and/or create props if required by the Props Designer.
• Ability to move quickly and efficiently and to collaborate with director, actors and production crew.
• Understanding of backstage etiquette related to noise and distractions

Responsibilities
Once the show is onstage for rehearsals (2 weeks before opening):
• Attend onstage rehearsals, first to watch from the front, then to observe backstage, then to work the rehearsal;
• During onstage rehearsals and during the 3-week run, ensure all required props are ready and in the correct position on the taped props tables in the wings or on stage;
• Prepare consumables (cold and hot food) if required;
• Fix any broken props and/or alert Props Designer;
• Props crew sometimes doubles as Stage Crew helping to change sets and furniture between scenes.
• On closing night, help to remove all props from backstage and return them to the right place in the props cupboard or the drapes cupboards.

Orientation/Training
Props Crew members are given a complete briefing of their duties before, during and after the show by the Props Designer. This includes the theatre’s policies, expectations, etiquette, etc. No prior experience is necessary.

Time Commitment
Be prepared to do at least two shifts a week during the standard 3-week run in addition to some evenings during the two final weeks of rehearsal on stage.
You must arrive one hour before curtain up, and plays are normally 2 to 2.5 hours in duration.

Commitment is what we are looking for from all volunteers. If you sign up to do props for a performance, you MUST be prepared to fill that obligation or arrange for a fellow crew member to cover your shift. The show cannot go on without props!

On-the-job supervision
Props Designer, Stage Manager

Benefits
Outlet for creative energy, collegial atmosphere, parties.
Chance to gain experience which might lead to paid positions elsewhere.

Major Objective
To research and read scripts, and then propose a season of plays and shadow plays to the OLT Board of Directors for approval, and to propose to the Board a slate of directors from the OLT Directors List to direct the chosen plays.

Qualifications
• Extensive knowledge of the tastes and interests the OLT audience, and of the success of previous productions by having attended performances regularly over multiple seasons;
• Ability to assess what makes a play appealing to an OLT audience and within the capabilities of OLT cast and crew;
• Interest in extensive reading and the time to undertake it.
Note: The Season Planning Committee (SPC) is made up of no more than seven members including an audience representative (knowledge of OLT audience appreciation), an actor, a crew member, a Board of Directors member, and no more than three play directors. Volunteers interested in joining the SPC should contact the Chair to see if there is an opening. Play suggestions can be made at any time by emailing artistic@ottawalittletheatre.com.

Responsibilities
• To look for and propose plays for consideration by the Season Planning Committee;
• To participate in a vote to decide which scripts to read from all the researched suggestions;
• To read, evaluate and rate (using a shared online evaluation form) all the chosen scripts (approx. 70-80) between January and June;
• To participate in a meeting to select a season and a shadow season from the scripts that have been evaluated and discussed (June);
• To participate in a meeting to decide who would be the best director for each play based on the directors’ submitted Expressions of Interest and the SPC’s knowledge of each director’s credentials (Sept-Oct).

Orientation/Training
The Chair of the Season Planning Committee will explain the finer points of the job and guide the process.

Time Commitment
• Two to three 4- to 5-hour meetings per year. (The SPC does not need to meet very often, but remains in regular communication via email.)
• Approx. 200 hours of reading time depending on how fast a reader you are. (Each of the 70-80 scripts probably requires 2-3 hours of reading and evaluation in your own time.)
• Committee members should attempt to attend all OLT productions and workshops to assess their success. Regular attendance at other theatres both in and outside Ottawa is an asset.

This is a two-year commitment to ensure continuity.

On-the-job supervision

Chair of the Season Planning Committee

Benefits
The Season Planning Committee performs the role of Artistic Director for the Ottawa Little Theatre. It is an enormous responsibility and requires hundreds of hours of reading. It is largely thankless, but the SPC has the honour of knowing that the enjoyment and satisfaction of future OLT audiences and of the cast/crews of future shows is in their hands.

Major Objective
Create the overall set design for a production – including a coloured scale model (1/2 inch = 1 foot) and full mechanical and construction drawings (plan and elevation at the same scale) – for the construction and painting crew.

Qualifications

• Training or equivalent experience in set design;
• Ability to understand and translate a play script into an appropriate visual and physical setting, taking into account the practicalities of the theatre space (sight lines, flying, scene changes etc.) and available budget so as to fully support the Director’s vision and to enhance a production;
• Ability to make clear mechanical and construction drawings (by hand or computer);
• Good sense of colour and knowledge of scenery construction, stagecraft, painting and lighting are desirable;
• Ability to discuss and negotiate concepts with the Director and respond to changing demands as the rehearsal period proceeds.

Responsibilities

• Read play script three times at least 3 months in advance of the production;
• Analyse requirements (setting, entrances, exits, scene changes) in full detail;
• Develop preliminary drawings and sketches in consultation with the Director, Lighting Designer and Costume Designer in time for, or before, the auditions;
• Lay out floor plan in rehearsal hall (by laying down tape) before rehearsals start;
• Build scale model and discuss and explain to cast and crew. Further consultations with the Lighting Designer are essential at this stage;
• Monitor rehearsals to check problem areas and make adjustments;
• Select furniture and set dressing materials (sometimes in collaboration with a Set Dresser);
• Complete construction drawings 6 weeks before production opens. (These must be available by the time the previous OLT production opens.);
• Attend meetings with construction and paint crew immediately before and while the set is built;
• Dress the set as it is built: e.g. furnishings, vegetation, drapes, carpets, pictures, lighting fixtures. (Optional, as some productions have a separate person for Set Dresser);
• Attend and participate as required in the set strike at the end of the production.

Orientation/Training

• A novice should work alongside an experienced OLT Set Designer through all stages of the production from script reading to set dressing for at least three productions to provide a solid grounding for proceeding with an independent design or a co-design.
• Summer set design courses (residential) are available through Theatre Ontario and can be extremely useful. Training in mechanical drawing is a major asset.
• If someone has designed sets elsewhere, mentoring by an experienced OLT Set Designer through one OLT production should be sufficient. This might not be necessary if previous proven experience is considerable.

Time Commitment
• Work needs to begin 3 months before the play opens. Meetings with the Director will require 3 to 6 hours at this stage.
• Designing, modelling and producing drawings requires up to 2 to 3 weeks of full-time work (usually off-site).
• Locating furniture and set dressing material can take a considerable amount of time. Cruising second-hand and fabric shops can become a regular occupation.
• All production meetings (usually evenings) should be attended, as well as the first read-through and a number of evening rehearsals (five is recommended).
• Frequent meetings with the construction and painting crew will total approximately 10 hours.
• Attendance during the day as construction starts is advisable and sometimes essential.
• Attendance at the first on-stage rehearsal and all technical rehearsals before opening is essential
• The time commitment (number of hours) for a set designer may total 4-5 weeks full time. However this is largely spread over a period of at least 3 months before the show opens and may be on or off site.
• Use of e-mail, scanning and computer design tools increases the flexibility of time and place. Nevertheless reliability, continuity and full commitment to the production are absolutely essential.
• Once the show opens, the Set Designer’s job is mostly done. However he/she should attend the post-production meeting.

On-the-job supervision
Supervision will be provided by the OLT Technical Director, Play Director and, in the case of a mentoring situation, another OLT Set Designer.

Benefits

Set design is a specialized creative artistic endeavour with many rewards. The result is an artistic product that is lit and inhabited for a period of 3 weeks. At the OLT, your set will be seen by over 5,500 people for over 2 hours per performance. Its contribution to the success of a production is critical and is recognized as such.
• The Set Designer becomes involved in almost all facets of a production. Although most of his/her work is completed once the play opens, he/she is widely recognized by the other designers, Director, cast and crew and becomes fully involved in the social aspects of a production.
• The Set Designer is named prominently in the show’s house program. (No honorarium is given for set design at the OLT.)
• The number of people involved in community theatre set design in Ottawa is probably around 15. Successful designing for one group quickly leads to requests and opportunities to design for other groups across the city, sometimes including professional ones.

Major Objective
The Sound Designer creates the overall sound environment and design for a production, including music, ambience, effects, and possible vocal reinforcement which will provide a high quality product in line with the Director’s vision of the play. The Designer also schedules and trains a crew to operate the sound during the run of the show

Qualifications

• Training or equivalent experience in theatre sound design;
• Knowledge and experience in obtaining, using and creating sound effects;
• Knowledge of audio equipment, its use and operation;
• Training in sound editing software is also an asset;
• Ability to understand and translate a play script into an appropriate aural and theatrical setting, taking into account the variables of the production (set, lighting, actor’s ability, etc) and the show’s available budget, so as to fully support the Director’s vision and to enhance the production;
• Good sense of hearing and timing;
• Ability to discuss and negotiate concepts with the Production Manager, Technical Director, Stage Manager and other design heads, and the ability to constantly respond to changing demands as the rehearsal period proceeds;
• Anyone new to OLT should work as a member of the Sound Crew on an OLT production to become aware of the theatre’s environment, equipment and practices;
• A novice should work alongside an experienced Sound Designer through all stages from script reading to post-production for at least 2 productions (of comparable complexity) to provide a solid grounding for proceeding with an independent design or co-design.

Responsibilities

• Read and understand the play well in advance of the production;
• Communicate with the Director to understand his/her vision of the production;
• Analyse sound requirements (setting ambience, establishing period, listed effects, introduction and bridge music) in full detail;
• Develop concept in consultation with the Director, Lighting Designer and Technical Director;
• Source, procure, record or obtain all required sound effects and music clips;
• Prepare critical effects that may be required during rehearsals (dance accompaniment, timed arrangements, etc.) and deliver to Director;
• Maintain communication with Director and monitor rehearsals to ensure sound design continues to fit blocking, staging, props, etc., and make adjustments as required;
• Select music for pre-show, introductions, bridges, curtain call, etc.
• Co-ordinate with Technical Director about the production’s special technical needs and upcoming theatre rentals.

Orientation/Training
Training is usually accomplished by working as an assistant to an experienced Sound Designer. The OLT sometimes offers courses in design. (Regularly check the website for Adult Workshops under LEARNING.)

Time Commitment
• Work should begin 3 months before the play opens. Meetings with the Director will require 1-3 hours at this stage depending upon the complexity of the play.
• Locating music and effects can take a considerable amount of time for complex productions. This can be through internet sources, OLT’s CD libraries, public libraries, or field recording depending on the show.
• Use of e-mail, internet, computer design tools, and offline effects tools increases the flexibility of time and place for preparation.
• All production meetings (usually evenings or Sundays) should be attended, as well as the first read-through of the script and a number of evening rehearsals.
• Once the show moves from the rehearsal hall to the stage, expect to be at (almost) all rehearsals for the two weeks prior to the production (3 to 4 hours/night).
• As with any team event, reliability, continuity and full commitment to the production are absolutely essential.
• Once the show opens, the Sound Designer’s job is mostly done but he/she should monitor the production, ensure crew coverage and be available to address issues and problems.

On-the-job supervision
Supervision will be provided by the OLT Technical Director, Production Director and OLT Stage Manager.

Benefits
• Sound design is a fulfilling technical and creative activity with many visible and hidden rewards. Taking a silent script and adding the music and effects to help bring a production to life for thousands of paying patrons is a major and satisfying accomplishment. At the OLT, your design will be heard by over 5,500 people.
• While the Sound Designer must complete significant work before the show goes “on-stage”, there is significant opportunity to interact with the show actors and crew for social events. Regular parties build team and community spirit and all designers and crew are invited to attend.

Major Objective
The sound crew member plays the sound cues during the onstage rehearsals and the run of the production as designated by the Sound Designer who will train you in advance.

Qualifications

Being “tech savvy” is a bonus to the OLT, however a desire to be involved, a willingness to learn, and the ability to accept responsibility are essential, and you must be able to commit the time to the production.


Responsibilities

• Arrive one hour before show time. Report to Stage Manager. Open tech booth. Start up sound system (using check list), check that all speakers are functioning, and begin pre-show music.
• At 7:55 PM, the Stage Manager will call up to start the show, and from this point the Stage Manager will call all the cues which you will implement. When the show is over, the Stage Manager will give you the go-ahead to shut down the system using the check list.

Orientation/Training
Be available to the Sound Designer at least two weeks before the show opens to learn the show, become familiar with the sound board and all sound cues for that show.

Time Commitment
Be prepared to do at least two shifts a week during the standard three-week run. You must arrive one hour in advance, and plays are normally 2 to 2.5 hours in duration.Commitment is what we’re looking for from new volunteers. If you commit to running sound for a performance, you must be prepared to fulfil that obligation, or make arrangements for a fellow crew member to cover your shift. The show cannot go on without sound!

On-the-job supervision
After training and orientation with the Sound Designer, you will be shadowed by an experienced operator for one or two shows until you are confident and comfortable enough to do it on your own. There will always be someone available to answer any questions that you might have.

Benefits
A feeling of achievement and the satisfaction of being an essential part of an artistic team are the primary benefits. You will also be learning an important theatre skill. Eventually you may be interested in assisting the Sound Designer as he/she creates the design and locates the effects. The final step could be to become a Sound Designer yourself. Socializing, parties and developing friendships are also significant benefits.

Major Objective
The Stage Crew is responsibility for moving sets and/or furniture between acts or scenes. (Not all shows have scene changes.) Props Crew sometimes doubles as Stage Crew.

Qualifications

• Ability to provide safe and proper placement of scenery and furniture on stage.
• Ability to follow the Crew Chief’s choreography quickly, unobtrusively, quietly, gracefully and efficiently.
• Having the requisite strength to lift furniture, etc. is an asset.
• Ability to collaborate with fellow stage crew members, director, actors and production crew.

Responsibilities
Once the show is onstage for rehearsals (2 weeks before opening):
• Attend onstage rehearsals, first to watch from the front, then to observe backstage, then to work the rehearsal;
• During onstage rehearsals and during the 3-week run, assist in moving sets and/or furniture into the correct position.
• Alert the Stage Manager of anything needing repair;

Orientation/Training
Stage Crew members are trained by the Set Designer, Stage Manager and/or Director. No prior experience is necessary.

Time Commitment
Be prepared to do at least two shifts a week during the standard three-week run in addition to some evenings during the two final weeks of rehearsal on stage.
You must arrive one hour before curtain up, and plays are normally 2 to 2.5 hours in duration.

Commitment is what we are looking for from all volunteers. If you sign up to work Stage Crew for a performance, you MUST be prepared to fill that obligation or arrange for a fellow crew member to cover your shift. The show cannot go on without scene changes!

On-the-job supervision
Set Designer, Stage Manager and Technical Director

Benefits
Outlet for creative energy, collegial atmosphere, parties.
Chance to gain experience which might lead to becoming a Set Designer or to work in other backstage areas on future shows.

Major Objective
To work with other committee members to build a solid and supportive volunteer component of the OLT that contributes to the theatre’s sustainability by ensuring the volunteer membership is engaged, and is free to work in a safe, healthy and creative environment. The ultimate goal of the theatre is to produce the highest quality product, and by doing everything feasible to optimize box office revenue – it cannot do this without the invaluable time and efforts of the many volunteers at the theatre – the Volunteer Committee represents all of those volunteers.

Qualifications
Detailed knowledge of OLT’s artistic accomplishments and challenges and the Volunteer body. Experience in a leadership role in several OLT productions or special events.

Responsibilities
• To work with other committee members to develop recruitment and retention strategies for volunteers.
• To encourage the sustainability of the OLT and its members, volunteers and audience by creating a welcoming and rewarding environment for our volunteers.
• To take a leadership role on various ad-hoc projects that will support the recruitment and retention of volunteers, such as volunteer appreciation events, etc.
• To provide input on the educational opportunities that will be offered at OLT each year.
• To ensure that every production has the full team of appropriately trained volunteers it requires to be successful.
• To perform the duties of Volunteer Liaison on approx. two productions per season (see below)

Volunteer Liaison Responsibilities
• The Volunteer Liaison of each production is available to support any member of the production team who has a production-related question or problem that cannot be otherwise resolved or that he/she prefers to discuss with a person less directly involved with the production.
• At the play’s audition, the Volunteer Liaison will invite any potential back-stage/front-of-house volunteers to the foyer for a briefing about the responsibilities of being a volunteer at the theatre. After the briefing, the potential volunteers will be given a tour of the theatre. The Liaison will continue to be a contact for potential volunteers and continue to assist them in integrating into the theatre.

Orientation/Training

A two hour meeting with the existing committee members to bring new recruits up to date on the plans so far.

Time Commitment
• A 2-3 hour meeting every five weeks
• 5-20 hours a month for various volunteer activities you get involved with and take the lead on (depends on each individual and the nature of the project)
• Additional work as assigned by the committee (variable depending upon what project you are working on).This is a two-year commitment to ensure continuity.

On-the-job supervision
Chair of the Volunteer Committee or the head of your Sub-Committee.

Benefits

An opportunity to shape the environment in which we all come to play. The Committee members are the ambassadors to the Volunteer body at large and have the opportunity to create a warm welcoming environment for new comers, and a rewarding, empowering environment for existing volunteers. Creativity is key and opportunities are endless to come up with new ideas to support the Volunteers. There is great freedom and support on this committee to develop and implement your ideas as long as the objective to make OLT a better place to spend our time.